Lancer Blog


I still hold that the most biblical way to educate your children is to homeschool. Unfortunately, not everyone has the resources or training to do this, much less do it well. Christian schools are the next best alternative. Christian schools are not universally excellent, and I would encourage parents to be selective in their due diligence process. Still, God has worked powerfully in and through Christian school since their inception. Christian schools have come a long way since the little red schoolhouse model. A rapidly increasing percentage of Christian schools, while remaining committed to Biblical principles and truth, are committed to providing an excellent education stemming from research-based best practices. The misperception that the academic product offered by the Christian school is somehow cheapened due to its ministry component had some validity in the early days. Now, however, quality Christian schools understand that they must be excellent in everything because Christ is excellent. For these schools, long gone are the days when it was acceptable to sacrifice or compromise the quality of academics, athletics, and/or the arts as long as we were teaching the Bible. Schools like Cambridge Christian School understand that Jesus is still the most important thing we will teach our students. If our academic offering is perfect, and only high caliber scholars are graduating from our school, but they do not know (or know about) Christ and have no interest in pursuing His will for their lives, we have done them a disservice. That being said, while Jesus is #1, everything else is #1a. Providing knowledge and inspiring thinking in the separate disciplines must be done through a Biblical worldview lens and must be done with excellence. All truth is God’s truth; therefore, scientific facts math proofs are subsets of God’s truth. Our students must be armed with truth to face this world, but the addition of wisdom, knowledge, and critical thinking will make them world engagers, confronters, and changers. Understanding the identity and direction of Christian schools in America today, what if there were none? If a national mandate came down prohibiting both Christian schools and homeschool, and we were given no choice but to comply, what would be the impact? The 3-legged stool (home, church, and Christian school) that represents Kingdom Education would fall. The training of our children (16,000 hours in K-12) would be delegated in large part to the state. Children from homes that partner with the church and prioritize Christ would face an ongoing battle of contradiction in terms of worldview development. Children from homes that do not partner with the church and do not prioritize Christ would have zero exposure...

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What Lens Are You Using?

What Lens Are You Using?


Posted By on Apr 4, 2017

Shawn Minks

I used to work in a Christian school in the Bible belt. It was a Christian school where the admissions policy required at least one parent from every incoming family to be a Christian. In the Atlanta area, that policy can be enforced with ease, as seemingly everyone claims to be a Christian. Even outside the Bible belt, according to recent surveys by the American Culture and Faith Institute, 7 out of 10 Americans call themselves Christians. However, just 1 in 10 holds to a Biblical worldview on topics such as “lying, cheating, stealing, pornography, the nature of God, and the consequences of unresolved sin.” Why this chasm between talk and walk? Think about it… some of you bristle at the very idea that someone claim an exclusive definition of a “Biblical worldview” of sin and a Savior. George Barna, the author of the above study, issues an important disclaimer: “Only God really knows who is a Christian. Only He knows who has a Biblical worldview. God alone knows what’s in the mind and heart of each person.” With that preface, many potential explanations exist for the chasm. One may not truly be a Christ-follower. All Christ-followers are continually growing in our understanding of who He is and how we are to respond. One need look no further than Paul, who could not understand why he did what he did not want to do (Romans 7). Still, our actions and decisions emanate from an often deeply entrenched worldview. Many folks are unhappy with the current direction of American culture. Culture is defined by behavior. Behavior is determined by values. Values do not exist in a vacuum; they are born out of a worldview. Ninety percent of a person’s worldview is formed during childhood and adolescence. In my experience, I have found that some view God’s Word through the lens of the world, and some view the world through the lens of God’s Word. The latter can be defined as a Biblical worldview. What lens are you using? I am a proponent of Christian schools for reasons far beyond the fact that they have provided employment for my wife and me for 25 years. Christian schools have partnered with my family for 22 years of raising children. On Monday through Friday, between class and school activities, our kids have spent the bulk of their waking hours in school. Teachers and coaches have been primary influencers on the shaping of our three children. I cannot imagine knowingly assigning influencers that regularly teach my kids that there is no such thing as truth – or encourage them to make their own. Rather,...

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So, what IS the reason for the season?  Quick and simple answer, of course, is Jesus!  This time of year, we hear it in songs, read it on greeting cards, and notice it on bumper stickers.   But, slowing down to take a little closer look may stir us to even deeper devotion and higher praise. The apostle, inspired by the Holy Spirit in Galatians 4:4-5, includes a brief but remarkable point that we often slide right over.  “But when the fullness of the time came…”  It’s Paul’s way of saying that beyond the fact that God’s Son CAME to earth…  WHEN He came is truly momentous.  He arrived on earth as the God-Man, Jesus, at precisely the right instant… in the “nick of time”! Using some documented, historical information concerning things like life and death of Israel’s King Herod, his known census mentioned in the New Testament, known astronomical events in the heavens, etc. we find that Jesus’ earthly life took place from 3 or 4 BC to approximately 30 AD.  Having pinpointed the “moment” in time, we can review what the world was like then… – the long-standing, strict and oppressive Roman rule over the known world served to heighten the longing for the coming Messiah in the hearts of all Jews to the highest levels. – that same imperial reign of the Caesars had eventually established the “Pax Romani” (the Roman Peace), an era of unprecedented tranquility which would make Christian evangelism possible and successful.  Within one generation of Jesus, all that would change. – a common language (Greek) had spread and was spoken all throughout the empire, making not only trade, but the wide transmission of Gospel truth rapid and effective. – sea lanes and international trade routes were openly established and securely monitored allowing the growth of Jesus’ message in virtually every culture. – during those particular 30-35 years a host of Old Testament prophecies were accurately fulfilled.  However, in order for this to be so, changes in the world had to have taken place ahead of time… changes such as….     …the Romans would have to institute an entirely new method of execution (crucifixion) which wasn’t even invented centuries earlier when the Messiah’s death was specifically and graphically described (Is. 53).    …Herod would have to feel the need to conduct an empire-wide taxation census to bring Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem by precisely the right day, in order for the Savior to be born when and how it was foretold.    …in order for Jesus to be sold for the prophesied slave price (30 pieces of silver), an exact level of inflation in...

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